InstitutTermine und Infos
17. ISEG: The Entrepreneurship and Cluster Foundations of Development Revisited. From Theoretical Assumptions to Policy Implications | Prof. Dr. Hector Rocha

17. ISEG: The Entrepreneurship and Cluster Foundations of Development Revisited. From Theoretical Assumptions to Policy Implications | Prof. Dr. Hector Rocha

Prof. Dr. Hector Rocha,  IAE – Business and Management School of Austral University, Business Policy and Entrepreneurship Department, Enterprise Board for Integration and Development.

Description

A growing number of scholars and policymakers are turning their attention to the role of clusters and entrepreneurship in fostering regional development. This five-module seminar is intended for participants interested in the linkages between entrepreneurship, clusters, and regional development from both a conceptual and policy standpoint. In particular, we will discuss (1) the theoretical assumptions underlying different conceptualisations of these three phenomena; (2) the theoretical arguments and empirical evidence on the relationship between entrepreneurship, clusters and regional development; and (3) the academic and policy implications according to different paradigms on the rationale underlying the relationship between entrepreneurship, clusters, and regional development.

Programm und Ablauf des Seminars

22. - 26.01.2007 jeweils von 16:00-19:00 Uhr

  1. Session (22. January): Development Safari – From Classical Economics to the Capability Approach
    • Todaro, M. (2000): Economic Development. 7th edn,  Essex, England: Addison-Wesley.
    • Cheshire, P.C. and Malecki, E.J. (2004): Growth, development, and innovation: A look backward and forward. Regional Science  83, 249-267.

  2. Session (23. January): Clusters Safari – From Industrial Districts to Clusters
    • Martin, R. and Sunley, P. (2003): Deconstructing Clusters: Chaotic Concept or Policy Panacea? Journal of Economic Geography  3, 5-35.
    • Observatory of European SMEs (2002): Regional Clusters in Europe. 3. 1-66. Belgium:  Enterprise Publications, European Commission.
    • Rocha, H.O. (2004): Entrepreneurship and Development: the Role of Clusters. A Literature Review. Small Business Economics  23, 363-400.

  3. Session (24. January): Entrepreneurship Safari – From the Entrepreneur to Organization Creation
    • Thornton, P.H. (1999): The Sociology of Entrepreneurship. Annual Review of Sociology  25, 19-46.
    • European Commission (2003): Green Paper. Entrepreneurship in Europe.  European Commission - Enterprise Publications.
    • Shane, S. (2003): A General Theory of Entrepreneurship. The Individual-Opportunity Nexus. Cheltenham, UK: Edward Elgar, Chapter 1.

  4. Session (25. January): Entrepreneurship, Clusters, and Regional Development – Theoretical Explanations and Empirical Evidence
    • Glaeser, E.L., Kallal, H.D., Scheinkman, J.A. and Shleifer, A. (1992): Growth in Cities. Journal of Political Economy  100, 1126-1152.
    • Porter, M.E. (2003): The Economic Performance of Regions. Regional Studies  37, 549-578.
    • Reynolds, P., Storey, D.J. and Westhead, P. (1994): Cross-National Comparisons of the Variation in New Firm Formation Rates. Regional Studies  28, 443-456.
    • Rocha, H.O. and Sternberg, R. (2005): Entrepreneurship: The Role of Clusters. Theoretical Perspectives and Empirical Evidence from Germany. Small Business Economics  24 (3):267-292.

  5. Session (26. January): Entrepreneurship, Clusters, and Regional Development – Academic and Policy Implications
    • No readings. Participants have to infer the academic and policy implications from the previous four modules.

Content of each session

Each meeting will start with a discussion session (90 minutes), followed by a short break (15 minutes) and a lecture (75 minutes).

The discussion session will be based on a list of three to four readings, with the following assignment questions:

  • One-paragraph summary of the reading (What is the message of each reading?)
  • Three takes-away from the reading (What are the contributions of the reading to our knowledge?)
  • Relationship among the readings
  • Academic and policy implications

H. Rocha